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CVl Annual Review


CVl Annual Review

Charting Our Progress is CVL’s annual review, with archives available

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Lifespan Brain Study Adds Possible Clue in Predicting Alzheimer’s

Jan 22, 2019

New CVL research suggests that periodic evaluation of changing amyloid levels in certain brain structures may offer an important clue into who may be on a trajectory toward Alzheimer’s disease.

Deposits of a protein called amyloid in the brain are one of the earliest signs that an individual is at high risk for developing Alzheimer’s. The findings, published in the Nov. 6, 2018, issue of the journal Neurology, indicated that early changes in amyloid in posterior cortical regions of the brain were associated with subtle declines in episodic memory — one’s memory for events, times and places that are autobiographical in nature. Declines in this type of memory are known to be one of the first symptoms of Alzheimer’s.

The research was conducted as part of the Dallas Lifespan Brain Study (DLBS), initiated and led by Dr. Denise Park, director of research for UT Dallas’ Center for Vital Longevity, Distinguished University Chair in Behavioral and Brain Sciences, a UT Regents’ Research Scholar and senior author of the study. Lead author of the study was Dr. Michelle Farrell, who earned her doctorate at UT Dallas in 2017 before recently joining the Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at Massachusetts General Hospital.

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