Science Luncheon Series: Spring 2015


The Center for Vital Longevity's Science Luncheon Series is a program of weekly talks that brings together UT researchers and outside experts to talk about recent developments in cognitive neuroscience and aging research. All lectures will take place at 12:00 p.m. in the 8th Floor Conference Room at the Center for Vital Longevity, 1600 Viceroy Drive, Dallas, TX. Please RSVP to cvlevents@utdallas.edu.
Spring 2015 schedule (PDF)

  • Feb. 02, 2015 | Science Luncheon Series

    Memory encoding and memory interference: an fMRI study

    Josh Koen, Ph.D.

    Univ. of Texas at Dallas - Center for Vital Longevity


  • Feb. 09, 2015 | Science Luncheon Series

    Episodic memory in epileptogenic hippocampi: predicting memory deficits

    Brad Lega, M.D.

    UT Southwestern Medical Center


  • Feb. 16, 2015 | Science Luncheon Series

    Building blocks of reasoning ability

    Silvia Bunge, Ph.D.

    Univ. of California, Berkeley


  • Mar. 02, 2015 | Science Luncheon Series

    The representation of episodic memory in single neurons of the human hippocampus

    John Wixted, Ph.D.

    Univ. of California, San Diego


  • Mar. 09, 2015 | Science Luncheon Series

    What do grey matter volume biomarkers tell us about the psychosis dimension?

    Elena Ivleva, M.D., Ph.D.

    UT Southwestern


  • Mar. 23, 2015 | Science Luncheon Series

    How does testing affect learning? From careful anatomy to a remindings account via reverse inference

    Steve Nelson, Ph.D.

    U.S. Dept. of Veterans Affairs


  • Apr. 06, 2015 | Science Luncheon Series

    A pathophysiology-based treatment for fibromyalgia

    Sven Vanneste, Ph.D.

    UT Dallas - BBS


  • Apr. 13, 2015 | Science Luncheon Series

    The role of attention in age-related associative memory impairments

    Audrey Duarte, Ph.D.

    Georgia Tech


  • Apr. 20, 2015 | Science Luncheon Series

    Investigating migraine pathophysiology using preclinical models in rodents

    Greg Dussor, Ph.D.

    Univ. of Texas at Dallas - BBS


  • Apr. 27, 2015 | Science Luncheon Series

    Aβ status interacts with risk factors to influence cognition in clinically normal individuals

    Elizabeth Mormino, Ph.D.

    Harvard University